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Research shows age 37 is evidently ‘too old’ for clubbing

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Bad news for anyone born prior to 1980: new research carried out by Currys PC World suggests that individuals 37 or older may want to think twice about that night of clubbing. Apparently, 37 is the new “tragic.”

If this news comes as a shock or shatters some looming weekend plans, it may help to hear that the same research also suggests 31 is the average age staying in actually becomes preferred.

It appears though that this study failed to ask its participants directly about wanting to listen to actual music in a club or similar setting. Instead, wording questions in terms of tasks, inquiring about desires like to get “dressed up” (22%), “arrange babysitters” (12%) or “book a taxi” (21%).

The list goes on as such, with expense being quoted as the main excuse.

Matt Walburn of Currys PC World said:

“The Great Indoors study recognises the fact that there comes a time when we appreciate our home comforts more than a hectic social life and it can often be a drag to play the social butterfly at parties and nights out.

Walburn continued:

“Technology is a big lure of staying in and our findings show how it’s transformed home habits, with Brits proudly investing in their households more than ever before. It’s now almost impossible to get bored at home, with endless box sets and the latest technology, such as 4K TV, enhancing the in-house experience, so much, that it often surpasses its ‘outdoor’ equivalent.”

“That coupled with social media, online shopping, and gaming with pals often means more pleasure can be had on a night IN than a night out.”

Though nights spent staying in can be pleasant regardless of generational barriers, we’d argue that not much else compares to the timeless act of losing sight of one’s age on the dance floor.

Via: Yorkshire Evening Post

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Study suggests millennials prefer staying in, crying over student loan debt to clubbing

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